Jump to content
Morpheus ©

29 Maggio 1985: per non dimenticare

Recommended Posts

Joined: 14-Jun-2008
11,011 posts
My friendship with Mauro from Turin

that survived the horror of Heysel

The parallels between Liverpool and Juventus – preparing for next week’s Champions

League final – are uncanny but the events of that night in Brussels have left deep wounds

by KEVIN SAMPSON (THE GUARDIAN.com 31-05-2015)

For the first 12 months, we thought his name was Garino. That’s how Mauro introduced himself. Sitting outside the port of Calais sipping lukewarm beers, we noticed a lad eyeing us up. From his attire – training shoes, Benetton shirt and neat, side-parted hair, we’d assumed he was a fellow Merseysider – until he spoke.

“Hello, I am Garino. Is possible one beer?”

With those words a lifelong friendship began. Mauro was hitchhiking back to Turin, having thumbed it to Glasgow to see Juventus play Celtic in the 1981-82 European Cup. Liverpool were European champions and we struck up an immediate rapport. Mauro said one of his dreams was to stand on the Kop but his first visit to Liverpool in 1982 didn’t coincide with a home game. Instead, we hopped on the “ordinary” to Birmingham and queued up outside the Witton End to see Liverpool beat Aston Villa 4-2. Mauro was amazed that so many away fans travelled and loved the rough and tumble of the crowd surges whenever Liverpool attacked. More than anything, he loved the debauched atmosphere in our pubs and clubs – he thought we were “crazy”, in a good way.

My first trip to Turin in the autumn of 1984 underlined the similarities between our home cities. Each boasted rich mercantile histories – Liverpool’s built on its docks, Turin’s more recent prosperity stemming from Italy’s biggest manufacturing industry, Fiat. Both cities’ workers had strong, socialist traditions and a fierce rebellious streak but, by 1984, both were in the grip of a recession.

In the winter of 1980-81, a six-week strike against mass redundancies at Fiat’s huge Turin plant was defeated. It signalled the beginning of the end for collective bargaining in Italy and a consequent surge (particularly among the youth) towards the Colletivo Anarchisti. It was a near mirror-image of Liverpool’s accelerated decline under Thatcher and a shift, particularly among the youth, towards Militant and isolationist politics. Both Merseyside and Turin endured large-scale unemployment through the 1980s, along with its side-effects – poverty, crime and drug addiction. Football was truly, for many, an opiate.

And the Turinese love of football was on a par with anything back home. Wherever I went, taxi drivers, bar staff, old men in cafes would be pouring over La Stampa’s pale green football edition. As soon as Mauro explained my allegiances, they wanted to shake my hand, buy me a drink and thank me for Liverpool’s beating of FC Roma in the European Cup final earlier that year.

“Not so lucky when you play us, though,” winked one old boy.

It was the ultimate dream. Juventus were champions of Italy once again, and all we spoke of us was how brilliant it would be if our teams were to meet.

But when Liverpool beat Panathinaikos to set up that dream final, I had a real foreboding. That mid-80s team of ours was beating everyone, in those days. Mauro had come to love his Christmas benders in Liverpool – but would he still be our mate if we thrashed Juve three or four nil? Little was I to know that this would be the least of my worries.

In the weeks and days leading up to the final, which was to be played in the historic Heysel Stadium in Brussels, Mauro and I were on the phone constantly, making arrangements. We’d meet in the Grand-Place at 1pm, his friends and mine, and we’d all have a day in the sunshine. Our little group based itself in Ostend and, on the morning of the game, got the train up to Brussels. But, arriving in the Grand-Place, we were greeted by a raucous cacophony and a sea of red. There must have been 10,000 people packed into the old square, singing and cavorting – there was no way in the world we were going to find Mauro.

It was only once we got into the taxi, after the game, around 11pm that we began fully to understand what had happened. We’d had seats, and we’d seen the fighting on the terraces to our right – but we had no idea anyone had died. Uefa wouldn’t have let the match go ahead if there had been anything serious, would it? But, outside the ground, a young policeman warned me to hide my scarf. He said there were gangs with knives out looking for Liverpool fans and advised us to keep our heads down. We flagged a cab and the driver told us about the death toll. I felt sick. Was Mauro OK? This was a pre-mobile phones era, so there was no way of checking. Arriving at the two-star B&B that had been home for two days, the proprietor could barely look at us as she let us in. Over breakfast the next day there was silence.

I left it two days before I was able to call Mauro. The first thing he said was:

“Where you in the terrace?”

I could hear the relief in his voice when I told him I’d been in the seats.

Over the next few weeks, my friend Peter Hooton called on all his contacts in the city to arrange a friendship trip for a group of Juventus fans, led by Mauro. John Peel DJ’d an exuberant gig on the Royal Iris ferry boat but, while the clubs, hotels and restaurants of Liverpool threw open their doors, it was only Everton that invited the young Italians to their ground.

The friendship with Mauro went lukewarm for a year or two. He had become a father, but I understood the difficulty he had justifying his links to Liverpool. In Italy, in those days, our FA Cup was almost as greatly revered as the Champions League is today, and Mauro’s other big ambition was to go to the FA Cup final. (Fittingly, his first game on the Kop was versus Notts County, upon whose black and white stripes Juve’s kit is based.) His birthday is 8 April and, when a spare ticket became available for the semi-final against Nottingham Forest in 1989, I snapped it up. We persuaded Mauro to come over for a belated birthday trip and, when he opened his card on the Friday night, he just stared at the ticket before bursting into tears. Twenty-four hours later we were in tears again, safe ourselves but shattered as news of Hillsborough’s mounting death toll came through. Mauro put his arms around me.

“Now I think you know,” he said.

It seemed inevitable that, 20 years after Heysel, Liverpool should be drawn against Juventus in the Champions League. Of course Mauro came for the first leg, at Anfield. We threw a birthday party for him in a little Italian restaurant, but he seemed withdrawn. I told him that Liverpool’s supporters had organised a huge commemorative mosaic on the Kop and that Ian Rush, who had played for both clubs, was going to present Mauro with a specially commissioned plaque, on the pitch, before the game. It was only then that he explained his dilemma. The majority of Juve’s hard-core Ultras Drughi had decided to boycott any attempts at friendship, deeming it too little, too late. Mauro went on to the pitch to receive the plaque from Rush, but many Juventus supporters turned their backs on the gesture. Fair enough.

In the years since then, both clubs have endured the extremes. Managers, owners, sponsors and players will come and go, but we, the fans, will always be here. Mauro’s and mine is just one small story of one lasting friendship, but it is, in microcosm, the story of football – the people’s game. So, in Saturday’s final, I won’t be joining the love-in for Barcelona, the world’s favourite club. For me, it’s the Old Lady all the way. Forza Juve.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 14-Jun-2008
11,011 posts

Beacon of Heysel casts a shadow

With Juventus again aiming to rule Europe, Rory Smith

writes on the shame that Turin struggles to confront

by RORY SMITH (THE TIMES 04-06-2015)

 

The fallout

  • Fourteen Liverpool fans were convicted of involuntary manslaughter in April 1989, typically receiving three-year sentences, half of which were suspended.
  • English clubs were banned from Europe for five years, and Liverpool for six after the disaster.
  • As a result of a Belgian inquiry, Albert Roosens, secretary general of the Belgian Football Union, was given a six-month suspended sentence for “regrettable negligence”.
  • Two senior police officers were given the same sentence, with a Belgian judge describing their negligence as “extraordinary”

 

Now, at last, the victims of Heysel have their place among the trophies and the memories in the Juventus museum. It is nothing elaborate: a translucent pillar, a beacon of white light, inscribed with the names of the 39 who lost their lives in Brussels. Its power comes, in part, from its simplicity. Its significance, though, lies in its presence.

That Liverpool have always found remembering what happened on May 29, 1985, uncomfortable may not be palatable but it is, at least, explicable. It is difficult to tell how many fans were involved in the three terrace charges, in the space of less than half an hour, which led to the tragedy but, whatever their number, few buy the line that it was all instigated by the National Front. Liverpool supporters charged; 39 people died.

Likewise, it is not hard to see why that night is such an awkward memory for Uefa. It was its decision to stage the European Cup final at a crumbling ground deemed unfit for purpose by a safety report the day after the disaster, despite being warned by both clubs involved that it was not up to scratch.

The Belgian authorities, too: they were in charge of a ticketing policy that resulted in Sector Z, supposedly neutral territory next to the Liverpool fans, becoming a de facto Juventus section; they left the Italian fans there without anything approaching adequate police protection; they allowed a crowd of 58,000 to gather at a ground where there was just one doctor.

Like Uefa, they had a responsibility to keep those attending the game safe; like Uefa, they failed in that duty of care. That is why, just as 26 Liverpool fans were eventually found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for what happened that night, there were charges levelled against Jacques Georges, the Uefa president at the time, two police officers and the secretary general of the Belgian Football Union.

It has always been much harder to understand why — before that memorial was unveiled in 2012 — Juventus shared their discomfort at the very mention of Heysel, to explain why Otello Lorentini, for so long the driving force demanding justice for the families of the victims, admitted as early as December 1985 that his campaign was “falling on deaf ears”.

It has been hard to grasp why his grandson, Andrea, the man who succeeded him as president of the families’ association after his death, can write of the “bewilderment, reticence, guilty silences and suspicion” that Juventus, and Italy’s football authorities, have offered over the past 30 years, and to comprehend why it is only now that the club are starting to right those wrongs.

To Maurizio Crosetti, a journalist and author who was at and has written extensively about Heysel, it is rooted in shame at the club’s initial response. That Juventus players that night did not know the scale of the disaster — the numbers of dead — when they and Liverpool took to the field at 9.41pm to kick off is accepted, but accounts as to how much they knew vary.

Stefano Tacconi, the goalkeeper, has said that they knew there had been fatalities. The sister of Gaetano Scirea, the captain, told GQ that he had told her the players did not want to play. That they did so, under the instruction of Uefa, may seem craven now but there was, at least, some sort of logic to it: the fear that the trouble might get worse if the game did not start.

What has always been more problematic have been the images of joy after Michel Platini scored the goal that won the game and the pictures of the France midfielder, among others, beaming as they lifted the club’s first European Cup. Less than a week later, Platini denied that he had taken a lap of honour; it is not hard to contradict that version of events. “They prioritised the sporting victory,” Crosetti says.

Francesco Caremani, author of Heysel: The Truth and a friend of the Lorentini family, is more scathing. “They knew about the deaths, they knew everything,” he writes.

“There are no excuses or sociological theories to explain [their] behaviour,” he adds, dismissing the claim of some players that they were ordered to celebrate with their fans. It has only been in the past few years that steps have been taken to help the club to deal with what Crosetti refers to as the “shadow” that Heysel had cast over Juventus. There is the memorial in the museum, a display of 39 stars at the stadium and a mass, held every year on the anniversary and attended by players, past and present.

“People still do not like to talk about it,” Crosetti says. “But it is something that is in our minds every year.” It is particularly poignant now, of course, 30 years on with Juventus in another final. “Those of us in Berlin will be thinking about it,” he says. They have not allowed those names on that Plexiglass pillar to be forgotten.

 

DQUFVm7O.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 14-Jun-2008
11,011 posts
“Infiltrati” contro l’intolleranza

di SEBASTIANO VERNAZZA (SPORTWEEK 06-06-2015)

Il 29 maggio è stato “celebrato” (si fa per dire) il trentesimo anniversario della strage dell’Heysel. Il fatto che oggi come allora la Juve sia in finale di Champions League – nel 1985 si chiamava Coppa dei Campioni – non significa nulla, è soltanto una coincidenza, e in ogni caso all’Olympiastadion di Berlino non dovrebbe ripetersi nulla di simile, perché le misure di sicurezza attorno a un evento del genere si sono moltiplicate per mille.

Quella sera del 1985 a Bruxelles, per Juve-Liverpool, soltanto quattro poliziotti presidiavano il settore Z, la fetta di stadio in cui si consumò la tragedia. Trentanove furono le vittime e, leggendo gli articoli rievocativi per il trentennale, ci ha colpito un particolare che ignoravamo: tre dei morti non erano tifosi juventini, ma interisti, persone andate in Belgio per accompagnare amici o parenti bianconeri. Nino Cerullo, Mario Ronchi e Tarcisio Salvi, questi i loro nomi e cognomi.

Chissà se stasera a Berlino ci saranno interisti al seguito, per fare compagnia a conoscenti juventini. Viviamo tempi in cui il tifo, complici Facebook e Twitter, si è radicalizzato e la rivalità tra juventini e interisti è sfociata in una specie di guerra santa, ma forse i social rappresentano soltanto la realtà virtuale. Nella vita vera è successo che degli interisti siano morti per vedere una finale della Juve e, chi lo sa, magari cinque anni fa al Bernabeu per Inter-Bayern sedevano viceversa degli juventini. Sarebbe bello se gli “infiltrati” uscissero dall’ombra e raccontassero le loro storie, sarebbe uno schiaffo agli intolleranti della rete (e delle curve).

mTdIyJjF.jpg

Edited by Ghost Dog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 14-Jun-2008
11,011 posts

EL   DÍA   QUE   MURIÓ

EL FUTBOL

La historia del futbol cambió el 29 de mayo de 1985, cuando cientos de hooligans ingleses invadieron un

sector de las gradas del estadio de Heysel, en Bruselas, Bélgica, donde se celebraría la trigésima Final

de la Copa de Campeones de Europa — ahora Champsions League - entre el Liverpool y la Juventus.

La incursión costó la vida a 39 personas. Esta es la historia reconstruida con testimonios colectivos y

dos entrevistas con el aficionado presente Sergio Marcheselli y el periodista Francesco Caremani

por JUAN MANUEL VILLALOBOS (MILENIO - LA AFICIÓN 06-06-2015)

Fue un tsunami. Yo estaba en el sector N, exactamente en la zona opuesta al sector Z, a un costado de la tribuna cubierta; me di cuenta que estaba pasando algo extraño porque los aficionados del Liverpool comenzaron a lanzar objetos contra un sector ocupado por tifosi de la Juventus y luego, de repente, se fueron hacia ellos de manera compacta, unida, como una ola. En un cierto punto, se detuvieron y comenzaron a retroceder, pero solo un poco: volvieron a avanzar de nuevo y esta vez ya no se detuvieron... Luego regresaron cantando a su sector. Eso es lo que recuerdo, que cantaban; estaban festejando.

Yo y mis vecinos lo único que hemos distinguido fue una trifulca, una ola de personas que va de un lado a otro. Había hecho el viaje con unos amigos de Turín. Era una fiesta; nuestro día, si eso puede decirse. Muchos éramos de Arezzo y muchos nos conocíamos; de ahí era también Roberto, cuyo caso fue emblemático, ¿lo sabes?, quizá fue el más conocido, porque murió aplastado tratando de dar respiración boca a boca a un niño que se encontraba en el suelo. Roberto era médico. Fue su padre quien lanzó la asociación de víctimas de Bruselas, Otello Lorentini. Y el del señor Gonnelli, y el de su hija, Carla, que entre la confusión y el caos, lo fue perdiendo de vista. Murió asfi xiado. Y Carla, sabes, el caso de Carla es como el de una novela. Ella cuenta que se resbaló y de súbito, un inglés, John, la ayudó a levantarse; le salvó la vida. Carla buscó algunos años después a John, quiso saber quién era, y lo encontró, y se terminó casando con él, y contó su relato a un diario. Dijo entonces que también hubo ingleses de nuestro lado, como si la batalla del campo, la de las gradas quiero decir, hubiera, por fi n, fi rmado un armisticio.

Pero esas heridas no se cierran. Pasan los años y no se cierran. Era una manga de maleantes, no de aficionados al futbol. Hubo un inglés que sacó una pistola, ¿sabes? Algunos introdujeron cuchillos, navajas. Los italianos éramos todos controlados; entrábamos lentamente al estadio, mientras que los ingleses entraron sin ningún control, con botellas de cervezas y barras de hierro y de madera. Tenían intención de matar desde un principio.

Hay un periodista, Caremani, que escribió un libro sobre la tragedia de Heysel. Él accedió a muchos documentos: las autopsias fueron un desastre. Hubo gente que vagabundeó por Bruselas, desorientada, durante toda la noche. Fue mucho después que llegaron las ambulancias, los bomberos. Pero dentro del estadio solo se percibía la tensión, del otro lado, y mucha gente sobre el campo. Yo te hablo en parte de todo lo que leí después: que el ejército tomó el estadio, que fue una barda a la que todos se dirigían huyendo de los bárbaros la que cayó colapsada por el peso; que muchos aficionados invadieron el campo para salvarse, mientras los policías se dedicaban a dar macanazos para que la gente retrocediera; que los hooligans ingleses hurgaron en los bolsillos de los muertos y tiraron al aire sus pertenencias; que la vigilancia era muy pobre; sí, que hubo treinta y nueve muertos, treinta y dos italianos; otros siete, belgas y franceses. Que hubo más de seiscientos heridos. Que en solo diez minutos había ocurrido la mayor tragedia en la historia del futbol. Hoy, todos sabemos que hay un antes y un después de Heysel.

Miles de tifosi bianconeri habíamos llegado muy temprano en autocares desde Italia. Yo recuerdo que pegaba el sol de una manera misteriosa sobre los núcleos de acero del Atomium, y recuerdo que se desprendía un reflejo anaranjado que iluminaba con su resolana todos los jardines cercanos al estadio. Así la recuerdo yo, aquella tarde, la del 29 de mayo de 1985, que se convirtió en una peregrinación para velar muertos. Y recuerdo un momento hermoso: cuando iba buscando mi zona para entrar al estadio me topé con un aficionado del Liverpool; le propuse intercambiar mi camiseta —claro, ¡llevaba una de repuesto!—; y el aficionado de los reds accedió. Nos despedimos y recuerdo muy bien que fue él y no yo, quien me deseó good luck, con un gesto amable. Esa camiseta la quemé nada más volví a Italia.

Nos habíamos dado cita sesenta mil personas y el estadio estaba lleno a las siete de la tarde, una hora y media antes de que comenzara la fi nal. Al día siguiente, los equipos ingleses fueron vetados del territorio belga de forma indefinida y el 1 de junio, menos de 72 horas después, con el apoyo de Thatcher, quien ya había anunciado unilateralmente su propia autoexclusión de otras competiciones, la UEFA suspendió, por cinco años, a todos los clubes ingleses de las competiciones europeas y, por siete, al Liverpool. Lo más simbólico fue que el anuncio no se hizo desde Suiza, su sede, sino afuera del número 10 de Downing Street, en Londres.

Después se hizo famoso el informe Taylor, del lord Taylor. ¿Lo conoces? Fue el que promovió la prohibición de la venta de bebidas alcohólicas en los estadios de Inglaterra, obligó a que se portaran cartas de identificación de los miembros del club y expandió el uso de las cámaras de grabación en las tribunas; y, algo que habría salvado, quizá, la vida de algunos aficionados en Bruselas: se eliminaron todas las curvas de los estadios y se quitaron todas las vallas divisorias entre la cancha y las gradas.

Tuvieron que pasar más de diez años, desde el año 85, para que 14 británicos fueron condenados a tres años de cárcel con libertad condicional; ¡por Dios, con libertad condicional!; diez años, para que el comandante de la policía y responsable de la seguridad en el estadio y el secretario de la federación belga, también lo fueran. La UEFA también se vio obligada a pagar el proceso judicial entero. Sí, pasó todo eso, y sin embargo, cuando se ve que la violencia sigue ahí, durmiendo en los estadios, me da la impresión de que solo los ingleses han aprendido algo de aquella lección terrible.

Después me dediqué a ir todos los días a la biblioteca de Arezzo. Estudié el término hooligan. Quería saber por qué habían muerto unos aficionados al futbol simplemente por serlo. Fue acuñado por los medios de Inglaterra a principios de los años ochenta. Se trataba de bandas organizadas de entre cien y ciento cincuenta personas dispuestas a irrumpir de manera violenta en las citas deportivas de sus equipos, el Leeds, el Arsenal, el Chelsea, el Leicester... La banda del Liverpool tenía el sobrenombre de Nutty Crew. Eran, se decía, los más salvajes. Y ahí estaban, el 29 de mayo, enloquecidos frente a niños, madres, parejas jóvenes, familias ubicadas en el sector Z del estadio Heysel, que era una prolongación del sector ocupado por los ingleses.

De todo lo previo, me acuerdo vagamente. A las siete menos cuarto, los jugadores de la Juve salieron por primera vez al campo. Cinco minutos después salió el Liverpool, en pants. Pelotearon unos balones y enseguida se volvieron todos al vestuario. Es cuando se lanzan los primeros objetos; apenas falta una hora para que comience el partido. Cinco minutos después, es la ola de la que te hablo; el tsunami que lo arrasa todo. Era el infierno. La única televisión que fi nalizó la transmisión cuando se conocieron los hechos fue la alemana.

No lo sabíamos, pero el ejército había tomado el estadio. Thatcher y Bettino Craxi habían hablado por teléfono: una hora de acuerdos. Y se tomó, por razón de Estado, la decisión: la única manera de salvar vidas era garantizar la salida controlada del estadio. Un oficial de la Fuerzas Armadas entró en ambos vestuarios y explicó que el encuentro se tenía que llevar a cabo para dar tiempo a una evacuación eficaz. Phil Neal, capitán del Liverpool, y Gaetano Scirea, nuestro Scirea, de la Juve, nos anuncian por megafonía que el partido se va a jugar. Recuerdo claramente, como si fuese ayer, que Scirea dijo: “giochiamo per voi”. Los rumores de que hay muertos se han comenzado a esparcir, pero es imposible saberlo. Te lo aseguro, nadie hubiese estado dispuesto a cambiarse por ninguno de aquellos veintidós jugadores para disputarse el torneo con más prestigio en Europa. Esa Copa no cuenta. No fue una victoria; fue una gran pérdida. Una derrota para el futbol. Sí, fuimos campeones de Europa, la primera Copa, pero no se puede ser campeón contando muertos.

 

C2DXneqw.jpgg1REMDVG.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Derby di Liverpool: il ricordo delle vittime dell'Heysel è da brividi 

DTR_W-jW0AETK6b.jpg

 

http://bit.ly/2mzo5zY

 

Venerdì scorso Liverpool ed Everton si sono sfidati ad Anfield Road in un match di FA Cup vinto dai Reds con rete decisiva messa a segno da Virgil Van Dijk. I tifosi ospiti, arrivati ovviamente in massa ad Anfied Road, hanno voluto ricordare le 39 vittime dello stadio Heysel con degli adesivi che sono stati appiccicati in ogni seggiolino del settore ospiti di Anfield Road. Gli 'stickers' sono un attacco frontale al Liverpool descritto come un club: "Offeso da tutto ma che non si vergogna di niente", poi una doppia scritta in italiano ed inglese: "Noi ricordiano il 39" con loghi di Everton e, appunto, Juventus. Oltre a questa iniziativa i tifosi dei Toffees hanno anche abbandonato il settore ospiti al minuto numero 39.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Max Gazzè: “Ero all'Heysel quel 29 maggio”

http://bit.ly/2HN4CVk

 

C’è un mondo dal quale Max Gazzé si sente totalmente lontano, quello del calcio: «Eppure sono finito in una polemica sui social tra tifosi della Juve e del Napoli - racconta -. Mi hanno fatto passare per anti-juventino. Ma io vi assicuro che il calcio non lo seguo e non ne so nulla».

 

È sempre stato così: «C’è un fatto che nessuno sa e che spiega tutto. Nel 1985 ero all’Heysel, a Bruxelles, alla finale di Coppa dei campioni. Sono cresciuto in Belgio ed è per questo che quel 29 maggio mi trovavo lì per Juve-Liverpool, proprio nel settore Z. Accompagnavo mio cugino, appena arrivato da Roma. Vidi tutto: i corpi schiacciati, la gente presa a manganellate dalla polizia, alcuni amici con la faccia coperta di sangue. Mi ritrovai con le spalle contro un muro. Riuscii a scavalcarlo e a saltare giù. Corsi a casa, ero sotto choc. Avevo 17 anni. Col calcio chiusi quella sera stessa, e per sempre».  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Briaschi ricorda l’Heysel: “Se non avessimo giocato sarebbero morti in mille”

Risultati immagini per heysel strage

 

https://bit.ly/2sirJQJ

 

 

Massimo Briaschi è stato intervistato in esclusiva da La Repubblica. L’ex Juventus ha ripercorso la tragica finale dell’Heysel: “Se non l’avessimo giocata ne sarebbero morti mille, non trentanove. La mattina andammo alla Grand Place per fare due passi, ma non scendemmo neppure dall’autobus. C’erano già centinaia di inglesi ubriachi, casse di birra sui tavoli, vetri a terra. Bruxelles ci fece paura e tornammo in albergo”.

Briaschi: “Il giro del campo ci fu imposto dal presidente Sordillo”

“Il mio legamento crociato era rotto –  ha aggiunto Briaschi – ma non avrei mai rinunciato alla finale. Feci una prima infiltrazione, poi la seconda. Mi rivedo nell’angolo dello spogliatoio e intanto arrivano le prime notizie confuse, c’è un morto, forse due, si sono menati, hanno attaccato con i cavalli. E io penso che se la partita non comincia, cesserà l’effetto delle iniezioni”.

 

“Si cominciò lentamente a intuire la portata del dramma, dico intuire perché il numero dei morti ci venne comunicato in pullman, dopo la finale, neanche allo stadio. Andammo sul campo in cinque o sei giocatori per parlare sotto la curva dei nostri tifosi, che era dall’altra parte rispetto al muretto crollato. Dicevamo state calmi, giocheremo per voi, lo stesso messaggio letto dal povero Scirea e da Neal prima del fischio d’inizio. E vi assicuro che se non ci fossimo mossi noi, quella gente non l’avrebbe tenuta nessuno”.

 

“Restai in campo per 84 minuti – conclude -, poi mi sostituì Prandelli. Avevamo aspettato quella notte come la più importante della nostra vita, ci sentivamo al sicuro, volevamo vincere finalmente la prima Coppa dei Campioni della Juventus. Ma niente era normale, intatto. Chi se ne frega se il rigore non c’era. Vincemmo, ma solo perché l’avevamo dovuta giocare. Il presidente federale Sordillo ci chiese di fare il giro del campo col trofeo, e di farlo durare il più a lungo possibile perché i nostri tifosi restassero sulle gradinate mentre gli hooligans stavano uscendo. Quanto si è speculato su quel giro di campo, e su troppe altre cose. Io dico solo che quella notte ci toccò viverla. E chi non c’era porti rispetto”.

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 09-Feb-2006
17,228 posts

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 21-Nov-2011
927 posts

Fratelli

Lo scorso week end ero a fare un giro nelle langhe (sono appassionato di vini), e sono capitato a Cherasco.

Mi sono quasi perso passeggiando per le vie della cittadina (che è un gioiello, chi non la conosce ci vada perchè merita davvero), quando ad un tratto, entrando in un parco pubblico alla fine del corso principale, mi sono trovato di fronte ad un monumento.

 

Pelle d'oca, e ricordi che ancora oggi fanno male (ho l'età per ricordare troppo bene quel giorno maledetto...)

 

Chi può passi, e mandi un bacio in cielo.

Monumento Heysel Cherasco.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 14-May-2020
2 posts

Ciao a tutti,


tra pochi giorni, il 29 Maggio 2020, ricorrerà il 35° anniversario della tragedia di Heysel.

 

Ho letto vari commenti qua e là nel web, recenti e non, che però poi "deviano" tutti immancabilmente sugli aspetti calcistici.

 

Penso che sia giusto ricordare che quella tragedia, prima ancora che calcistica e di tifoseria, è innanzitutto una tragedia umana, in cui delle persone che intendevano svagarsi assistendo alla partita dei loro beniamini hanno invece trovato la morte in una maniera incredibilmente assurda e stupida.

 

I più giovani erano un bambino di 10 anni e una ragazza di 17 anni (  https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strage_dell%27Heysel ); molti altri avevano meno di 30 anni.

 

Per quella tragedia le autorità belghe condannarono 26 hooligans inglesi, che poi ebbero dei notevoli sconti di pena (chissà perché).

 

Ciò che più mi rattrista è che dopo 35 anni, a parte le facce di due di loro ( https://www.********************/topic/328394-heysel-offesa-la-memoria-dei-39-angeli-in-vendita-tazze-foto-e-borse-raffiguranti-due-hooligans-con-cappello-e-bandiera-della-juventus-due-giorni-dopo-la-tragedia/ ), degli altri 24 non abbiamo mai saputo niente: nomi, facce, pena effettiva, ecc.

 

Eppure hanno 39 morti sulla coscienza. Eppure al loro paese si finisce in prima pagina per delle str...ate molto meno gravi. Perché di loro non si è mai saputo niente?

 

Credo che questa omertà sia innanzitutto una mancanza di rispetto per quei 39 che non ci sono più, e poi una vergogna per dei paesi (tutti quelli coinvolti) che si credono di essere civili.

 

Credo anche che non sia giusto commemorare il tragico evento soltanto il giorno del suo anniversario e poi dimenticarsene il giorno dopo.

 

E' un evento che, secondo me, dovrebbe essere sempre presente nella nostra mente e nel nostro cuore, e non solo quando si giocano le partite.

 

Un evento che meriterebbe molta più risonanza di quanta ne ha avuto finora.

 

Perché è una tragedia che ci riguarda tutti come esseri umani ed è un insulto alla nostra vita.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 05-Oct-2008
72,289 posts
12 ore fa, Carlo62 ha scritto:

Ciao a tutti,


tra pochi giorni, il 29 Maggio 2020, ricorrerà il 35° anniversario della tragedia di Heysel.

 

Ho letto vari commenti qua e là nel web, recenti e non, che però poi "deviano" tutti immancabilmente sugli aspetti calcistici.

 

Penso che sia giusto ricordare che quella tragedia, prima ancora che calcistica e di tifoseria, è innanzitutto una tragedia umana, in cui delle persone che intendevano svagarsi assistendo alla partita dei loro beniamini hanno invece trovato la morte in una maniera incredibilmente assurda e stupida.

 

I più giovani erano un bambino di 10 anni e una ragazza di 17 anni (  https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strage_dell%27Heysel ); molti altri avevano meno di 30 anni.

 

Per quella tragedia le autorità belghe condannarono 26 hooligans inglesi, che poi ebbero dei notevoli sconti di pena (chissà perché).

 

Ciò che più mi rattrista è che dopo 35 anni, a parte le facce di due di loro ( https://www.********************/topic/328394-heysel-offesa-la-memoria-dei-39-angeli-in-vendita-tazze-foto-e-borse-raffiguranti-due-hooligans-con-cappello-e-bandiera-della-juventus-due-giorni-dopo-la-tragedia/ ), degli altri 24 non abbiamo mai saputo niente: nomi, facce, pena effettiva, ecc.

 

Eppure hanno 39 morti sulla coscienza. Eppure al loro paese si finisce in prima pagina per delle str...ate molto meno gravi. Perché di loro non si è mai saputo niente?

 

Credo che questa omertà sia innanzitutto una mancanza di rispetto per quei 39 che non ci sono più, e poi una vergogna per dei paesi (tutti quelli coinvolti) che si credono di essere civili.

 

Credo anche che non sia giusto commemorare il tragico evento soltanto il giorno del suo anniversario e poi dimenticarsene il giorno dopo.

 

E' un evento che, secondo me, dovrebbe essere sempre presente nella nostra mente e nel nostro cuore, e non solo quando si giocano le partite.

 

Un evento che meriterebbe molta più risonanza di quanta ne ha avuto finora.

 

Perché è una tragedia che ci riguarda tutti come esseri umani ed è un insulto alla nostra vita.

 

 

Beh, devo dire la sincera verità, la prima parte del tuo discorso, l'andare ad indagare minuziosamente sui singoli individui di quella tragedia... forse poteva avere un senso a quell'epoca, oggi la sento inesistente come esigenza. Preferisco dedicare il ricordo alle vittime che rimestare tra i carnefici. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 14-May-2020
2 posts

Ciao Bradipo76,

 

mi spiace che tu la pensi così, perché sembra quasi che il tempo possa annullare ogni cosa.

 

In questo modo anche chi è colpevole può raccontare a se stesso che non è mai successo niente e che può smettere di preoccuparsi, se mai lo ha fatto.

 

Per me si tratta di 39 vite perdute che non hanno avuto il riconoscimento che meritavano. Non credo sia cosa da poco.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Alcuni tifosi granata sono saliti a Superga per ricordare le vittime bianconere dell'Heysel in occasione del 35º anniversario della tragedia di Bruxelles. 29 maggio 1985 - 29 maggio 2020. GRAZIE RAGAZZI!

 

Immagine

 

❤️

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 27-May-2011
101,203 posts
11 ore fa, Socrates ha scritto:

Alcuni tifosi granata sono saliti a Superga per ricordare le vittime bianconere dell'Heysel in occasione del 35º anniversario della tragedia di Bruxelles. 29 maggio 1985 - 29 maggio 2020. GRAZIE RAGAZZI!

 

Immagine

 

❤️

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 27-May-2011
101,203 posts

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

29 maggio 1985: la strage dell'Heysel

29 maggio 1985: la strage dell'Heysel

 

 

 

Sono trascorsi 35 anni dalla tragedia che sconvolse per sempre il calcio europeo: Liverpool Juventus in campo, per una finale di Coppa dei Campioni segnata da una tragedia indimenticabile. Il teatro fu lo stadio Heysel di Bruxelles, le vittime 39 innocenti, uccisi da una follia umana che avrebbe macchiato questo sport in modo indelebile. .....

 

1. Rocco Acerra
2. Bruno Balli
3. Alfons Bos
4. Giancarlo Bruschera
5. Andrea Casula
6. Giovanni Casula
7. Nino Cerullo
8. Willy Chielens
9. Giuseppina Conti
10. Dirk Daeneckx
11. Dionisio Fabbro
12. Jaques François
13. Eugenio Gagliano
14. Francesco Galli
15. Giancarlo Gonnelli
16. Alberto Guarini
17. Giovacchino Landini
18. Roberto Lorentini
19. Barbara Lusci
20. Franco Martelli
21. Loris Messore
22. Gianni Mastroiaco
23. Sergio Bastino Mazzino
24. Luciano Rocco Papaluca
25. Luigi Pidone
26. Benito Pistolato
27. Patrick Radcliffe
28. Domenico Ragazzi
29. Antonio Ragnanese
30. Claude Robert
31. Mario Ronchi
32. Domenico Russo
33. Tarcisio Salvi
34. Gianfranco Sarto
35. Amedeo Giuseppe Spolaore
36. Mario Spanu
37. Tarcisio Venturin
38. Jean Michel Walla
39. Claudio Zavaroni

 

Articolo completo -> https://bit.ly/2XfWOoZ

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Heysel, una tragedia senza colori: non solo bianconeri, morirono anche 3 interisti :| 

 

LE 39 VITTIME

 

 

 

Una tragedia in bianconero, ma senza colori. Perché all'Heysel, 35 anni fa, morirono 39 persone: italiani e non, juventini e non. La storia racconta, infatti, di tre interisti scomparsi quel giorno: Nino Cerullo, 23enne, Mario Ronchi, interista di Bassano del Grappa, e Tarcisio Salvi 49enne. Loro, coinvolti per la passione, per l'amore per il calcio, in una trasferta che non rispecchiava la loro fede. Da cui non sono più tornati. ......

 

Articolo completo -> https://bit.ly/2ZPe3iC

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Lorentini a BN: 'Mio padre eroe dell'Heysel. La Juve poteva fare di più, lui esempio per i giovani'

Heysel disaster of 1985 is football's forgotten tragedy and ...

 

 

 

Roberto Lorentini si era messo in salvo. Era un medico, juventino il giusto: "Non era un tifoso accanito, gli piaceva farsi qualche trasferta insieme ai cugini per vedere le città. Era stato anche a Basilea per la finale di Coppa delle Coppe". Quel maledetto 29 maggio 1985 era a Bruxelles, stadio Heysel. Era riuscito a sfuggire alla tragedia. Poi si voltò, Andrea Casula, 11 anni, aveva bisogno d'aiuto. Roberto gli corse incontro, e finirono tutti e due sepolti dalla bolgia: "Come medico si è sentito di dare una mano, servendo gli altri fino all'ultimo". Il figlio Andrea aveva 3 anni, e di quel giorno non ricorda nulla. Oggi, 35 anni dopo, ha raccontato a Ilbianconero.com quella tragedia vista dagli occhi di un adulto che si batterà sempre per ricordare la memoria del padre. ......

 

Articolo completo -> https://bit.ly/2XKigBi

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

Heysel, un sopravvissuto: 'Una foto e poi il buio, ecco cosa accadde'

 

Heysel, un sopravvissuto: 'Una foto e poi il buio, ecco cosa accadde'

 

 

 

Carmelo Di Pilla, fotografo sopravvissuto alla strage dell'Heysel di 35 anni fa ricorda quel tragico giorno: "Avevo prenotato la tribuna con tre amici, scoprimmo d’essere in curva quando ritirammo i biglietti e nemmeno ce la prendemmo più di tanto: contava esserci ed eravamo felici, volevamo cancellare la delusione di Atene dove avevamo visto festeggiare l’Amburgo", dichiara a La Stampa. 

TRAGEDIA ANNUNCIATA - "Si respirava un clima di festa, eppure un paio di cose mi trasmisero sensazioni bruttissime. Nel grande parco davanti all’Heysel sciamavano gruppi di inglesi già ubriachi. E la struttura mi apparve subito inadeguata: l’ingresso del nostro settore era una porticina rugginosa. Ci sistemammo lungo la scalinata centrale. Ricordo i gradoni fatiscenti, i sorrisi delle persone attorno e le bandiere della Juve, però mi inquietava quell’onda rossa che diventava sempre più gonfia e minacciosa: i tifosi del Liverpool urlavano e spingevano, lanciavano sassi e bottiglie rotte, guardavo dalla loro parte e li vedevo sempre più vicini". ......

 

Articolo completo -> https://bit.ly/2TROpWv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 18-Oct-2006
634 posts

La pagina più triste della nostra storia. Una serata che non potremo mai dimenticare. Una partita da non giocare. Onore ai 39 Angeli.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

L'omaggio della Mole Antonelliana per le vittime dell'Heysel

La scritta "+39 RISPETTO" per ricordare la tragica finale di Coppa Campioni tra Liverpool e Juventus del 1985

 

231214577-3396d727-6e62-498b-b7a2-e6a226

 

 

 

230529899-a412d399-75b5-407d-a30c-1c0b56

 

Altre foto -> https://bit.ly/2XhvTcq

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joined: 04-Apr-2006
119,780 posts

 

Chiellini ricorda le vittime dell’Heysel: «Oggi e sempre +39»

WhatsApp-Image-2020-05-29-at-11.47.44.jp

 

 

 

.... «Oggi e sempre +39», scrive il capitano bianconero su Instagram allegando la foto della targa commemorativa postata questa mattina dalla Juventus. Il popolo bianconero è più che mai unito nel ricordo in un giorno triste come questo.

 

Articolo completo -> https://bit.ly/2M8SCRx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...